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RAID 10 options [Solved]

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Mauser
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Re: RAID 10 options

#21

Post by Mauser » Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:52 am

gimcrack wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:38 am
Mauser wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:44 am
gimcrack wrote:
Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:25 am


What's file system are you using?

Btrfs supports RAID 0, RAID 1 and RAID 10 (RAID 5 and 6 are under development)

https://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org/index.php ... le_Devices
I wasn't using any file system since they are new HDDs but I tried disabling RAID and formatting the drives to ext4. Once I enable RAID Linux can't see it. Looks like in that link it will work if and only if it can see the drive which in my case it doesn't. Thanks for trying.
Requirements: minimum of 3 storage devices

Creating a Complex RAID 10 Array https://www.digitalocean.com/community/ ... n-debian-9

This links looks like a very good one to feed off of. If you have to clear your head. I always go outside and walk through the woods. When I walk back in to work again, it's like idea's that I haven't try out yet just falls in place. It can be done, as I'm reading some success stories.
I tried this once and it didn't go past the first command because mdadm would not run. The other thing is who ever wrote this doesn't know what a RAID 10 is because you need at least 4 drives and not 3. Looks like a hardware RAID card that is for Linux is the only option that would work.
I am command line illiterate. :confused:

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Re: RAID 10 options

#22

Post by Mauser » Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:56 am

I thought I found the correct card but it doesn't support 4TB HDDs.
I am command line illiterate. :confused:

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Re: RAID 10 options

#23

Post by Mauser » Fri Jan 11, 2019 12:49 pm

Update on the RAID issue. Called ASUS support for the 5th time and finally they told me it's a software chipset array that they have no Linux drivers for. ASUS falsely advertises that their motherboards have RAID. This explains why their motherboards have dropped in price from previous motherboards that I have used that have hardware RAID embedded into the motherboard and all setup and control was in the BIOS. This was the last product I will ever buy from ASUS. I have ordered a hardware RAID card that I hope will work because I couldn't find any cards that say they are for Linux and can do a RAID 10 with 4 drives with 4TB total support. I have 4 HDDs 2TB each that will come out to 4TB in a RAID 10 configuration. At least this card is a hardware RAID and can handle up to 4TB drives. :happy: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product. ... -_-Product I will update when I receive it and install it.
I am command line illiterate. :confused:

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m_pav
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Re: RAID 10 options

#24

Post by m_pav » Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:44 am

Glad to hear you got the truth. It helps when you have a bit of background understanding on your side. I think you'll find the other boards were also chipset software RAID with a smattering of configuration and next to 0 features typical of a true RAID controller.

I was heavily invested in IT for a grand total of 21 years, so I have seen stuff come and go. To my knowledge, Asus never had true hardware RAID. At best, they had something like what the Intel Baby Server motherboards have, (though likely less again) which required disabling onboard controller to use a real RAID controller.

I don't think you really need to go as far as tossing ASUS out the window, they all do it, so one is like the other. I simply recommend choosing more wisely in the future. I had a customer who wanted the latest of the latest to keep up with his mates, but he wanted to use it as a business machine at the same time. I took some time and educated him, gave him time to ponder and a week later he allowed me to choose a decent motherboard known for its rock solid performance and stability and put in the biggest CPU and rock solid stable graphics card + a server grade Power Supply and very good RAM. After 3 weeks of using it, he came bouncing in the door of my shop saying he'd never had such an amazing system. His friends were calling for warranty replacements and reloading their systems while his never missed a beat, it was quiet and he could easily keep up with them.

Moral of the story, leave the fizz and extras behind, do your research and don't be swayed by this extra or that, then buy with confidence having fully researched the hardware and usage type you need. Another trick is to never purchase version 1.0 motherboards, always go for the later revisions which have manufacturer bugfixes.

Software RAID works very well and is used in small enterprise with great success. I have had to recover and rebuild software RAID sets a number of times, each time with fear and trepidation, but always with success. :crossfingers: :spinning: :celebrate:
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Mauser
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Re: RAID 10 options

#25

Post by Mauser » Sat Jan 12, 2019 2:42 pm

m_pav wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:44 am
Glad to hear you got the truth. It helps when you have a bit of background understanding on your side. I think you'll find the other boards were also chipset software RAID with a smattering of configuration and next to 0 features typical of a true RAID controller.

I was heavily invested in IT for a grand total of 21 years, so I have seen stuff come and go. To my knowledge, Asus never had true hardware RAID. At best, they had something like what the Intel Baby Server motherboards have, (though likely less again) which required disabling onboard controller to use a real RAID controller.
That's not so because the last two computers I built prior to this one years ago, both had a hardware RAID. On those two "all RAID creation and configurations where done in the BIOS. This ASUS motherboard on my latest build doesn't because ASUS lied! :mad:
I don't think you really need to go as far as tossing ASUS out the window, they all do it, so one is like the other. I simply recommend choosing more wisely in the future. I had a customer who wanted the latest of the latest to keep up with his mates, but he wanted to use it as a business machine at the same time. I took some time and educated him, gave him time to ponder and a week later he allowed me to choose a decent motherboard known for its rock solid performance and stability and put in the biggest CPU and rock solid stable graphics card + a server grade Power Supply and very good RAM. After 3 weeks of using it, he came bouncing in the door of my shop saying he'd never had such an amazing system. His friends were calling for warranty replacements and reloading their systems while his never missed a beat, it was quiet and he could easily keep up with them.
I don't like being cheated, lied to, and ASUS support is abysmal.
Moral of the story, leave the fizz and extras behind, do your research and don't be swayed by this extra or that, then buy with confidence having fully researched the hardware and usage type you need. Another trick is to never purchase version 1.0 motherboards, always go for the later revisions which have manufacturer bugfixes.
I did my research but I was lied to. Also, no manufacture tells you which version of BIOS it has. Updating the BIOS was easy but ASUS or any other manufacture should put out hardware with defective firmware. It shows poor quality control to do so.
Software RAID works very well and is used in small enterprise with great success. I have had to recover and rebuild software RAID sets a number of times, each time with fear and trepidation, but always with success. :crossfingers: :spinning: :celebrate:
From what I understand, that's not the case because software RAIDs suffer from the possibility of data corruption. While hardware RAID doesn't and has protections.
I am command line illiterate. :confused:

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Re: RAID 10 options

#26

Post by BitJam » Sat Jan 12, 2019 3:19 pm

Mauser wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 2:42 pm
From what I understand, that's not the case because software RAIDs suffer from the possibility of data corruption. While hardware RAID doesn't and has protections.
This is simply not true. Maybe it was part of a sales pitch from a company that sells hardware RAID. The truth is the exact opposite. Software RAID is the safer choice because you are not tied to a particular manufacturer and/or their drivers. If the controller fails and the company is out of business then your data is gone. And as you've seen, proprietary drivers often don't play well with others in the Linux world. If you use software RAID, you can unplug the drives from one computer, plug them into an entirely different computer and get your data back. The small downside to software RAID is that you will want/need another disk to boot off of because the bootloader, kernel, and initrd need to be loaded before you can read the RAID device.

I had to deal with the proprietary driver problem when I was working at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and it was a nightmare to have a bunch of vital data held hostage by a hardware vendor. OTOH, in another situation I used a SCSI RAID controller to stripe data across four tape drives. I was building a high speed data acquisition system. I striped to get 4 times the speed. The tape drives were much better than disk drives (at least back then) because the disk seek times were killing us even when we wrote the data contiguously. I think the disks had to occasionally re-align their heads and we did not have enough RAM to buffer all the data coming in while this happened. The tape drives just purred along. Of course, after we got back we copied the data off the tapes to disk so we were not held hostage, we could back it up, and we had random access to it.
Will I cry when it's all over?
When I die will I see Heaven?

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Re: RAID 10 options

#27

Post by Mauser » Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:57 pm

BitJam wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 3:19 pm
Mauser wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 2:42 pm
From what I understand, that's not the case because software RAIDs suffer from the possibility of data corruption. While hardware RAID doesn't and has protections.
This is simply not true. Maybe it was part of a sales pitch from a company that sells hardware RAID. The truth is the exact opposite. Software RAID is the safer choice because you are not tied to a particular manufacturer and/or their drivers. If the controller fails and the company is out of business then your data is gone. And as you've seen, proprietary drivers often don't play well with others in the Linux world. If you use software RAID, you can unplug the drives from one computer, plug them into an entirely different computer and get your data back. The small downside to software RAID is that you will want/need another disk to boot off of because the bootloader, kernel, and initrd need to be loaded before you can read the RAID device.
That's not true. It's no sales pitch, it's a fact. The only true you typed out is "software RAID is that you will want/need another disk to boot off of because the bootloader, kernel, and initrd need to be loaded before you can read the RAID device." which makes a software RAID completely useless for my set up. I need to boot from the RAID.
I had to deal with the proprietary driver problem when I was working at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and it was a nightmare to have a bunch of vital data held hostage by a hardware vendor. OTOH, in another situation I used a SCSI RAID controller to stripe data across four tape drives. I was building a high speed data acquisition system. I striped to get 4 times the speed. The tape drives were much better than disk drives (at least back then) because the disk seek times were killing us even when we wrote the data contiguously. I think the disks had to occasionally re-align their heads and we did not have enough RAM to buffer all the data coming in while this happened. The tape drives just purred along. Of course, after we got back we copied the data off the tapes to disk so we were not held hostage, we could back it up, and we had random access to it.
I personally never had any problems with the hardware RAID 0 and RAID 1 running on two different computers I built. Both had ASUS motherboards that had the hardware RAID embed into the motherboard. All setup configuration was done in the BIOS. I even had a HDD failure on the RAID 1 that the hardware RAID alerted me upon boot up. I replace the bad HDD and the hardware RAID 1 did it's job. No data loss, no corruption. The RAID 1 was where I had all my data. Luckily I didn't have any HDD failure on the two WD Raptor HDDs I had running in RAID 0 because I would of had to re-install the O.S. and all it's programs which would be just a loss in time.
I am command line illiterate. :confused:

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Re: RAID 10 options

#28

Post by Mauser » Wed Jan 16, 2019 4:59 pm

I got the RAID 10 card and now that works but when I install MX Linux in UEFI mode it won't boot. The message is telling me there is no boot device even though there is. It's acting like there is no O.S. on my computer. I am running my new build with a live USB. I even tried booting in Legacy mode and it still doesn't boot. Any ideas?

Code: Select all

System:
  Host: mx1 Kernel: 4.19.0-1-amd64 x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc v: 6.3.0 
  Desktop: Xfce 4.12.3 Distro: MX-18_x64 Continuum Dec 20  2018 
  base: Debian GNU/Linux 9 (stretch) 
Machine:
  Type: Desktop Mobo: ASUSTeK model: TUF X470-PLUS GAMING v: Rev X.0x 
  serial: <filter> UEFI [Legacy]: American Megatrends v: 4207 
  date: 12/08/2018 
CPU:
  Topology: Dual Core model: AMD Athlon 200GE with Radeon Vega Graphics 
  bits: 64 type: MT MCP arch: Zen L2 cache: 1024 KiB 
  flags: lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 sse4a ssse3 svm 
  bogomips: 25552 
  Speed: 2083 MHz min/max: 1600/3200 MHz Core speeds (MHz): 1: 1602 2: 1642 
  3: 1589 4: 1585 
Graphics:
  Device-1: AMD driver: amdgpu v: kernel bus ID: 09:00.0 
  Display: x11 server: X.Org 1.19.2 driver: amdgpu,ati 
  unloaded: fbdev,modesetting,radeon,vesa resolution: 1920x1080~60Hz 
  OpenGL: renderer: AMD RAVEN (DRM 3.27.0 4.19.0-1-amd64 LLVM 7.0.0) 
  v: 4.5 Mesa 18.2.6 direct render: Yes 
Audio:
  Device-1: AMD driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel bus ID: 09:00.1 
  Device-2: AMD driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel bus ID: 09:00.6 
  Sound Server: ALSA v: k4.19.0-1-amd64 
Network:
  Device-1: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet 
  driver: r8169 v: kernel port: e000 bus ID: 03:00.0 
  IF: eth0 state: up speed: 100 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter> 
Drives:
  Local Storage: total: 3.65 TiB used: 1.38 GiB (0.0%) 
  ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: Marvell model: Raid VD size: 3.64 TiB 
  ID-2: /dev/sdb type: USB vendor: SanDisk model: Cruzer Glide 
  size: 14.59 GiB 
Partition:
  ID-1: / size: 4.60 GiB used: 271.7 MiB (5.8%) fs: overlay dev: ERR-102 
Sensors:
  System Temperatures: cpu: 28.5 C mobo: N/A gpu: amdgpu temp: 28 C 
  Fan Speeds (RPM): cpu: 0 
Repos:
  Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/antix.list 
  1: deb http://la.mxrepo.com/antix/stretch stretch main
  Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/debian-stable-updates.list 
  1: deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ stretch-updates main contrib non-free
  Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/debian.list 
  1: deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ stretch main contrib non-free
  2: deb http://security.debian.org/ stretch/updates main contrib non-free
  Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mx.list 
  1: deb http://mxrepo.com/mx/repo/ stretch main non-free
  No active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/various.list 
Info:
  Processes: 227 Uptime: 7m Memory: 5.82 GiB used: 894.5 MiB (15.0%) 
  Init: SysVinit runlevel: 5 Compilers: gcc: 6.3.0 Shell: bash v: 4.4.12 
  inxi: 3.0.25 

I am command line illiterate. :confused:

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Mauser
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Re: RAID 10 options

#29

Post by Mauser » Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:10 pm

In the mean time I am going to try to install it as Legacy instead of this garbage UEFI mode nonsense.
I am command line illiterate. :confused:

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Re: RAID 10 options

#30

Post by Mauser » Wed Jan 16, 2019 7:36 pm

I have learned a lot today and finally have MX Linux on my new computer build booting up from the RAID 10. I have learned that UEFI is the most annoying garbage that could ever be put in any computer. I had to use Legacy mode in order for my computer to work. As for any RAID configuration there is a 2TB patrician size regardless what anyone claims. This reason why MX Linux wouldn't boot because the main patrician was larger than 2TB. The strange thing the MX Linux installer was able to format the 4TB the first time but not the second time which is when I found an error. I had to manually patrician the RAID 10 drive by splitting the almost 4TB patrician. In order for any computer to boot from any RAID array you must use a hardware RAID. This issue is solved. Thank you all for all the help and pointing my in the right direction. The MX Linux is the best Linux forum. :number1:
I am command line illiterate. :confused:

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