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Mobile Intel 4 Chipset and Linux

If you are having a problem with getting any of your computer's hardware to work with MEPIS or you can't find the right driver, this is the forum to use. It's for newbies and regular users to post questions. Just make sure to post what hardware you are having problems with, in the subject and not just in the post's text area, please.
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antiX-Dave
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Re: Mobile Intel 4 Chipset and Linux

#11 Post by antiX-Dave » Thu Oct 02, 2014 5:10 pm

Warning I have not looked through all posts and trials... I have only read the main case and decided to post quickly...

With a couple of Intel graphics cards that I have some of the various programs could not find the display(lx/xfce4 display and grandr come to mind). However arandr had no trouble. Maybe worth installing and giving it a try. As with these graphics cards I have x -configure and sgfxi both did not setup a second monitor. I could do this manually by making an xorg.conf from scratch or arandr... and arandr was much simpler than the manual configuration. I know it is not exactly a great answer but it is 30 seconds to check if it works or not...

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whell
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Re: Mobile Intel 4 Chipset and Linux

#12 Post by whell » Thu Oct 02, 2014 10:38 pm

kmathern wrote:
uncle mark wrote: This is the same machine? Works with M11 but not MX?

Do this at your own risk:

Run sgfxi, if for no other reason than it will create an xorg.conf file. In fact, run it twice, just to make sure you've got the driver fully installed.

Then delete the entire contents of the MX xorg.conf file, and replace them with the contents of the M11 xorg.conf file.

Cross you fingers and hope there's no smoke leaks.
I don't think either M11 or MX14 create a xorg.conf by default. But if I recall correctly, they do both have some cheats that will create a xorg.conf, xdrvr=intel confx for M11, just xdrvr=intel for MX14 (I think). I kind of doubt that it will make any difference, but you can try them, as well as the xorg.conf that sgfxi creates.


I also wonder if maybe just a minimal xorg.conf with this "ReprobeOutput" option might work. (it's an option you can use with the Xorg intel driver)

Code: Select all

$ man intel | grep ReprobeOutputs -A4
       Option "ReprobeOutputs" "boolean"
              Disable or enable rediscovery of connected displays during server startup.  As the kernel driver loads it scans for connected displays and configures a con‐
              sole  spanning those outputs. When the X server starts, we then take the list of connected displays and framebuffer layout and use that for the initial con‐
              figuration. Sometimes, not all displays are correctly detected by the kernel and so it is useful in a few circumstances for X to force the kernel to reprobe
              all  displays  when it starts. To make the X server recheck the status of connected displays, set the "ReprobeOutputs" option to true.  Please do file a bug
              for any circumstances which require this workaround.

              Default: reprobing is disabled for a faster startup.
I think a minimal xorg.conf with it would look like:

Code: Select all

Section "Device"
  Identifier  "Card0"
  Driver "intel"
  option "ReprobeOutputs" "true"
EndSection

edit: the "ReprobeOutputs" option is only available in the updated version of the xserver-xorg-video-intel package, it wasn't in the original wheezy version
Yes, i've tried the xdrvr=Intel cheat to no avail. Interesting idea about the minimal corgi.conf file. I'll try that one this weekend and report back. Thanks!

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JimC
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Re: Mobile Intel 4 Chipset and Linux

#13 Post by JimC » Fri Oct 03, 2014 1:33 pm

Did you try the key combination to activate the HDMI port?

Sometimes, that's all that's needed.

For example, you'll usually find an Fn key on a laptop keyboard (usually near the bottom left of the keyboard), where if you press that Fn key and hold it, then press one of the function keys at the same time, and a given key combination lets you control certain features (screen brightness, volume, video modes, etc.). Your laptop's user guide should have more detail on what different key combinations are used for (Fn Key plus one of your function keys like F1, F2, F3, F4, etc.) I use those types of "action key" combinations on a frequent basis with my netbooks and laptops.

One of those key combinations is usually for controlling the display mode. You'll usually see an icon resembling a display on one of your Function keys (often F4) for switching between display modes (built in display only, external display only, both internal and external displays at the same time, etc.).

Ditto for other features like volume and screen brightness (you'll see icons on a laptop's function keys to identify what key is used for those features, where using the Fn key in combination with a specific Function key lets you control many settings).

IOW, with many laptops, just using the Fn key + F4 key (and the specific function key will vary between laptops, but you should see an icon resembling a display on one of them) allows you to switch the laptop's display modes so that it sends a signal to the HDMI port (or other port used by an external display); where pressing that same key combo again changes to the next available display mode.

The kernel and drivers for your specific chipset will need to support those features (and unless you have a brand new model, chances are existing kernels and drivers will).

So, using the key combination (Fn key + the needed function key like F4, etc.) for controlling display mode (internal display only, external display only, both internal and external display, etc.) is usually the easiest way to tell your laptop to send a signal to an external display if one is connected.

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whell
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Re: Mobile Intel 4 Chipset and Linux

#14 Post by whell » Fri Oct 03, 2014 2:34 pm

Well, still no luck with any of the above. :frown: I've tried minimal xorg file, and tried xorg file with cheat codes and xrandr commands. Still no dice on the HDMI.

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JimC
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Re: Mobile Intel 4 Chipset and Linux

#15 Post by JimC » Fri Oct 03, 2014 4:10 pm

You may want to boot into a Live CD or USB stick (to make sure something you've changed is not complicating the problem), and try the key combination method mentioned for changing video modes.

You may also want to try changing the keyboard layout settings to a laptop that has the same keyboard layout your laptop uses (and I don't even know what brand/model of laptop you're using, since I have not went through all of the posts you've made yet).

For example, with a distro like MX-14, you can go to Menu>Settings>Keyboard, click on the "Layout" tab, uncheck the box to use System Defaults, and you'll see a long list of different keyboard layouts you can choose from (including laptops from Dell, HP, IBM, etc.), so you can see if one of them allows you to use the action keys for controlling things like video mode (usually an Fn key plus a Function Key at the same time).

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