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New Computer

If you are having a problem with getting any of your computer's hardware to work with MEPIS or you can't find the right driver, this is the forum to use. It's for newbies and regular users to post questions. Just make sure to post what hardware you are having problems with, in the subject and not just in the post's text area, please.
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BitJam
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Re: New Computer

#11 Post by BitJam » Fri Aug 15, 2014 5:05 pm

Adrian wrote:In my opinion making sure MX installs on GPT should be the priority for the next release. However, since I don't have hardware to test on and I don't know much about GPT I think somebody else should take the charge for this one.
That's why I bought a UEFI laptop last week. I'm already booting my main (BIOS) system with GPT+Syslinux. Booting with BIOS + GPT is very straightforward. No surprises and I can provide easy instructions (it's just a slightly different set of instructions sent to parted). Booting with UEFI is a lot different. I think I have a simple recipe for that (at least for 64-bit) but antiX-13.2 has problems with the video drivers and with dbus. I think these are a kernel/system issues and independent of bootloading, which I have working now. The trick for the LiveCD/USB is to give the user menus in the bootloader. This could be a royal pain in the neck, especially if I have to write it all myself. You don't have this problem with the installer, IIRC, you're already using grub2.

Jerry wants tsplash for the next point release. Once that is under control I plan to swing back to the UEFI stuff. I might try to get 32-bit kernels working next since that would open the door to using the latest MX-14.x and the latest antiX-14.x. Once antiC is back, I'm sure I can get the antiX Live kernel config which will make my life much easier if I need to fiddle with the kernel config.

I really want our live media to be able to boot in BIOS and in UEFI. It we can use files from Ubuntu (and if we want to) then we should be able to boot in UEFI in secure mode. In the worst case the bootloader menu selections in UEFI mode may be limited ***sigh***. We use gfxboot for that now but it is based on BIOS calls. I don't know if those hooks are still available in UEFI mode. I think not. I'm hoping someone else has already solved this problem.

I've been using parted (the command line version of gparted) and I highly recommend it for installers or anything else that needs to create partitions. It is designed to be programmable in a way that is easy to see and debug. IMO, moving from fdisk to parted, will be painless and your code will be more understandable too. I haven't used gdisk much. I'm very happy with parted.

I'd like to see antix2usb be able to create LiveUSBs that boot on both BIOS and UEFI. I'd like our LiveCD to do so too. This is possible because UFI does not use the MBR, it only requires certain uefi files at certain locations on the filesystem. Besides lacking menus on UEFI, the biggest downside might be the extra space it takes up. There may be problems with some systems not working. So far, I am doing better than Ubuntu finding the squashfs file (which is a real show-stopper if you can't find it). Google(ubuntu "unable to find a medium containing a live file system") to get an idea of how many people are struggling with this on Ubuntu. My goal is to be able to boot on almost every system. The few times I've been stuck has been on very old hardware that might have been flaky in addition to being old.

I agree with you Adrian, this is one of those problems where you really need to get your hands on the hardware and experiment. Sorry, Peregrine, for veering so far off topic.

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Re: New Computer

#12 Post by Jerry3904 » Fri Aug 15, 2014 5:08 pm

What did you finally get for a machine?
Production: 4.15.0-1-amd64, MX-17.1, AMD FX-4130 Quad-Core, GeForce GT 630/PCIe/SSE2, 8 GB, Kingston SSD 120 GB and WesternDigital 1TB
Testing: AAO 722: 4.15.0-1-386. MX-17.1, AMD C-60 APU, 4 GB

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BitJam
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Re: New Computer

#13 Post by BitJam » Fri Aug 15, 2014 5:26 pm

uncle mark wrote: was advised to keep /home on the SSD but to move all the data folders (Documents, Movies, Music, etc.) to the HDD and link them back to /home. That way the faster drive is being used fully for all the common everyday tasks like web browsing and email and what-have-you, but the space hogs aren't using up the more valuable real estate on the SSD.
That's what I've been doing for many years even on hdds. This allow me to carry my data over from system to system. I *copy* the hidden files and directories to get a decent starting point. Usually if there is a new version of some software package it will update its hidden stuff the first time it is used. The downside is that I might be copying cruft. If you use the relatime mount option then you can find the cruft very easily because you can see which files have been read since you did the install as long as you haven't gone poking around in the hidden files. I think "cd ~; ls -lhutd .*" should suffice.
I also asked about trim and all that jazz, and was told to just chill out -- with a modern OS on modern hardware, just use the defaults and not sweat the small stuff.

IMO they told you wrong unless the default is to use fstrim in a cron job. As with wikipedia says:
A Trim command (commonly typeset as TRIM) allows an operating system to inform a solid-state drive (SSD) which blocks of data are no longer considered in use and can be wiped internally.

[...]Because low-level operation of SSDs differs significantly from hard drives, the typical way in which operating systems handle operations like deletes and formats resulted in unanticipated progressive performance degradation of write operations on SSDs. Trimming enables the SSD to handle garbage collection overhead, which would otherwise significantly slow down future write operations to the involved blocks, in advance.

If you add the "discard" option to the options in the fstab entry then this will negatively affect performance. Doing fstrim periodically only affects performance during the short time it is running. IMO running updatedb has a bigger performance hit. I notice when updatedb runs but I've never noticed when fstrim runs.

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Re: New Computer

#14 Post by BitJam » Fri Aug 15, 2014 5:48 pm

Jerry3904 wrote:What did you finally get for a machine?
Acer Aspire ES1-511-C59V 15.6-Inch Laptop (Diamond Black) which is now $40 less expensive than when I bought it. Last week the price shot up to $300. I got it for $250. No optical drive, Windows runs poorly (but can be tweaked with de-crapifier et al.) Runs Linux great. It has a usb 3.0 port and 2 usb-2 ports. They have already all come in handy. Wireless mouse + LiveUSB take up two of the three usb slots already. I'd highly recommend it but I think the devs should have different brands for testing purposes. Having two of the same is a bit of a waste. There are similar machines from Asus, Toshiba, and Dell (and maybe others). The prices fluctuate a lot. If you have the time, wait for a week or two to get a feeling for the prices. The Asus used to be $220 but now it is $250. The price for most of them were about $250 (or higher) when I was shopping, except for the Asus. Most of them are now under $250.

SORRY PEREGRINE!!

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Re: New Computer

#15 Post by Jerry3904 » Fri Aug 15, 2014 8:29 pm

SORRY PEREGRINE!!
:rofl:
Production: 4.15.0-1-amd64, MX-17.1, AMD FX-4130 Quad-Core, GeForce GT 630/PCIe/SSE2, 8 GB, Kingston SSD 120 GB and WesternDigital 1TB
Testing: AAO 722: 4.15.0-1-386. MX-17.1, AMD C-60 APU, 4 GB

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Re: New Computer

#16 Post by entropyfoe » Fri Aug 15, 2014 9:13 pm

Remember, to use TRIM on your ssd (and you should) you MUST format with ext4.

TRIM is not supported in ex3 or 2.

I put swap in the ssd, but always run heavy RAM, so it is rarely used.
I have three systems running on older OCZ stuff, 6 years total drive-years, no problems.

Change in strategy, my wife's Win 7 upgrade from XP uses a Samsung 840 Pro, very nice.
I am eagerly looking at the new Samsung 850 with the new VNAND, 10 year warranty !
Asus Prime 370X-Pro
AMD Ryzen 1600X (6 cores @ 3.6 GHz)
16 Gig DDR4 3200 (G Skill)
Nvidia -MSI GeForce GT 710 fanless
Samsung 960 NVMe SSD nvme0n1 P1,P2, and P3=MX-17.1, P4=antiX-17
1TB SSD sda1= Data, 2TB WD =backups
on-board ethernet & sound

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