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What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 2:48 pm
by snowieplays
I am fairly new to mx linux. I installed it fresh on my acer aspire a515-51. I have an intel 7200u processor, and was wondering if there was anything I should do after a fresh install. I already did the sudo apt-get dist-upgrade, but was curious if there were other drivers I should install afterwards?
also
is there anyway to customize mx?
Like themes, icon packs, etc?
sorry for the noob questions haha..

Re: What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 2:52 pm
by Adrian
There's nothing specific you need to do other than keep it up-to-date, I guess it depends what you want to do.
I would recommend looking through MX Package Installer (popular section) and see what programs you might find useful.

Re: What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 2:57 pm
by Stevo
If you install ocs-url, you can directly install wallpapers, themes, icon and mouse cursor themes, etc., from their webpages at xfce-look.org and other related sites. Just realize that this might be a security risk and keep a backup like Timeshift.

Re: What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 3:25 pm
by figueroa
Be happy. Just use the computer. Over time, you may identify the need or desire for some particular software. Don't become a software collector. Unneeded software are just avenues for something to go wrong. Stay lean and clean.

Enjoy the developer default settings. They are defaults because the developers thought they would be good. When you do want to change some things, just change one thing at a time. Keep track of what changes you make, so you can change back if you change your mind.

If you set lame passwords when you did the installation, change that. Practice safe computing. Welcome.

Re: What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 4:41 pm
by Antediluvian
Here a couple of things to do ...

Get to know the Xfce Desktop Environment. Documentation is here. For example, learn how to manipulate the panel (taskbar). (The panel is also explained in section 3.8.3 of the MX Manual.)

Read the MX Manual and be able to refer to the MX Wiki.

As you read you will discover things you can (and will want to) manipulate.
I would recommend looking through MX Package Installer (popular section) and see what programs you might find useful.
For example, if you have an HP printer then install "HP Printing" from Popular Applications > Printing.

Re: What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 6:13 pm
by Stevo
If you want to see some amazing desktop effects, you could install and run Compiz.
Or get wrapped up in customizing the Conky desktop widgets forever and ever, until your family runs an intervention.

Re: What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 8:55 pm
by JayM
I agree with figueroa and Antediluvian. Don't be in a hurry to start tweaking and customizing anything yet, or you'll end up breaking something or else will change something in a way that you don't want and you won't know how to put it back again. Better to spend a week or two using MX just the way it is and getting used to it.

Read the user manual (alt+F1), the wiki, and watch some of Dolphin_Oracle's videos. When you do start making changes and customizing things, just change one thing at a time then test it for a day or two to make sure it's how you want it.

A good learning experience would be to install Virtualbox then install Debian Stable onto a virtual machine, so you can compare MX with vanilla Debian. You'll learn what components came with Debian and Xfce and what were added by the MX team. For instance when I was a newbie I had a hard time figuring out all of the configuration tools in the menu and didn't understand why they seemed to be not very well organized. That's because almost everything in Settings and System were from Debian, while MX Tools has most of the MX-provided stuff. The MX Team decided to add a new menu category for their add-ons and preserve the original Xfce menu as much as possible, probably to make it easier for those coming to MX from other Xfce distros.

Regarding drivers, Linux is a plug-and-play operating system so your hardware should have been detected and the proper kernel modules for it installed at either installation or at first boot, so there shouldn't be any reason to install anything unless you have a laptop with Nvidia Optimus: two GPUs, one the standard onboard video chip and the other a dedicated Nvidia GEforce chip and VRAM. If you do and want to get that working so you can switch between video modes, search the forum for "bumblebee", which is the name of the Linux optimus software.

Do NOT add Ubuntu PPAs! That's a sure way to render your system unstable. Ubuntu applications aren't (necessarily) compatible with MX. If there's an app that you want and you can't find it in the repositories or find a different one that does the same thing, just ask that it be added, giving the URL of its PPA and/or Github/Sourceforge source code or existing .deb package if there is one, and a member of the MX Packaging Team will add it to the test repo if possible. They usually work very quickly too.

If you have questions or encounter problems please do search the forum first before asking. Chances are high that someone else has already asked the same or very similar question and has gotten an answer. Also do a (search engine of your choice) web search. I find that adding "-ubuntu" (without the quotes) at the end of my search string improves the accuracy of my results. (Sorry, Ubuntu, but it's true.)

Bearing in mind that just as MX isn't Ubuntu neither is it Arch, the Arch Wiki is a very valuable resource of technical information about Linux.

Re: What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 9:23 pm
by BitJam
@snowieplays, welcome!

If you do add packages or make some tweaks you could/should make an mx-snapshot backup. This will create an iso file with all of your modifications that can boot live. There are a number of cool MX respins and they were all create with this tool.

Then get a nice usb-3 usb stick (the Samsung models work well for me) and use live-usb-maker to create a full featured live-usb from your snapshot iso. We use the antiX live system which has a bunch of neat features. With persistence and remaster, some people only run live and don't bother to install. One of the great things about running live is you are free to experiment. If things go horribly wrong then either disable persistence or use the "rollback" boot option to get back to the way it was previously.

In any case, the live-usb made from the snapshot iso file will be a full system backup that you can keep in your pocket. You can also use to to rescue your installed system. Or any other system. Or use it to boot your system on different machines. Show your friends!

Re: What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 9:47 pm
by uncle mark
snowieplays wrote:
Fri May 17, 2019 2:48 pm
I am fairly new to mx linux. I installed it fresh on my acer aspire a515-51. I have an intel 7200u processor, and was wondering if there was anything I should do after a fresh install.
What you should do (IMO) is take some time to familiarize yourself with MX as it is OOTB. You'll have plenty of time to tweak and customize and break(?) it. There is a lot of info in the Manual and in the Wiki and right here in the forums, but if you're like me and learn more by doing than by reading about it, then get to using it and you'll know soon enough what you'll want to change and what's best left alone.

Re: What to do after installing?

Posted: Fri May 17, 2019 10:56 pm
by JayM
uncle mark wrote:
Fri May 17, 2019 9:47 pm
snowieplays wrote:
Fri May 17, 2019 2:48 pm
I am fairly new to mx linux. I installed it fresh on my acer aspire a515-51. I have an intel 7200u processor, and was wondering if there was anything I should do after a fresh install.
What you should do (IMO) is take some time to familiarize yourself with MX as it is OOTB. You'll have plenty of time to tweak and customize and break(?) it. There is a lot of info in the Manual and in the Wiki and right here in the forums, but if you're like me and learn more by doing than by reading about it, then get to using it and you'll know soon enough what you'll want to change and what's best left alone.
Then before you start changing things, back up your data in your home directory if there is any, then create a snapshot and burn it to a USB stick like BitJam suggested, so you can easily restore everything to the way it was if you need to.